WordPress Dashboard

Your admin login page is located at: yourdomain.be/wp-login.php

Once you are logged in, the WordPress Dashboard appears. This is your main administration homepage. At the very top of your Dashboard (and across every page) you will see the horizontal toolbar with the name of your site, logged in user and other usefull links.

The site name in top left corner is hyperlinked to your site's homepage. Move the mouse cursor over current user’s name in top right corner to reveal the Log Out link as well as a link to edit your Profile.

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1.1 Dashboard Menu Options

Down the left-hand side of the Dashboard and on every page you will see your main admin navigation menu. This is where you’ll find all the options to update and configure your site.

Hovering your cursor over each of the main menu options will display a ‘fly-out’ menu with the various choices for that particular menu option. Once you click each of the main menu options, that particular menu will expand to show all the available options within that section (if there are any).

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The main menu options and their usage are:

Dashboard

This will display your main Dashboard ‘homepage’. In the top left of your Dashboard you’ll see some brief stats on the number of Posts, Pages, Categories and Tags contained within your site, as well as the total number of comments and approved comments. There’s also a summary of how many Spam Comments you currently have.

Posts

This is where you can create a new Blog Post. You can also update your Categories and Post Tags.

Media

This is where all your uploaded images, documents or files are stored. You can browse through your Media library, as well as edit and update the files.

Pages

This is where you create and maintain all your Pages.

Comments

You can manage all your Comments within this section, including replying to comments or marking them as spam.

Appearance

This menu is where you control how your site looks. You can choose a new Theme, manage your site Widgets or Menus and even edit your site theme files.

Plugins

Plugins extend and expand the functionality of WordPress. You can add or delete plugins within here as well as activate or deactivate them.

Users

This screen lists all the existing users for your site. Depending on your Role, you can also add new users as well as manage their Roles.

Tools

This section gives you access to various convenient tools such as options to import and export data to/from your WordPress site. You can also run a Site Health check, which shows critical information about your WordPress configuration and any items that may require your attention.

Settings

This is where your site is configured. Among other things, it allows you to configure your site name and URL , where your Posts appear, whether people can leave Post Comments or not and numerous other settings. Most times, once your site is setup, there's no need to change any of the settings within this section.

At the bottom of the menu you'll see a link called Collapse menu. Clicking this will hide the menu and simply display their icons instead. Click the small arrow icon again to expand the menu.

Occasionally when you install a plugin, they will have their own configuration or setup pages. The location of these will be entirely dependent on the individual plugin but most times these pages will either appear within the Tools section, the Settings section or in a completely new menu section somewhere within the menu.

Posts & Pages

WordPress is built around two basic concepts - Posts and Pages. Posts are typical blog entries. A series of articles, listed chronologically (by date of publishing). Pages, on the other hand, are used for more static content (i.e. content that doesn’t change often or not at all).

An "About us" page is example of a Page on a typical website. In most cases you’ll find that the content in the ‘About us’ page doesn’t change all that frequently. The Page has a higher rank comparing to Post which means that a Page can contain post(s) and Post can't contain a Page.

The post are therefore used to display your news, events, projects or even just frequent company updates. Basically, any information that gets updated on a semi-regular basis can benefit from the ‘blog’ functionality.

2.1 Posts

After clicking on the Posts menu option you'll be shown a list of Posts that your site contains. Among the information displayed is the Post title, the Author, Categories, Tags, No. of Comments and either the Date Published, Date Scheduled or the Date the Post was Last Modified.

At the top of the page you can view how many Posts in total you have in your site, how many have been published by yourself or Published, Scheduled, Sticky, Pending, in Draft or in the Trash.

When hovering your cursor over each row, a few links will appear beneath the Post title:

  • Edit – Will allow you to edit your Post. This is the same as clicking on the Post title
  • Quick Edit – Allows you to edit basic Post information such as Title, Slug, Date plus a few other options
  • Trash – Will send the Post to the Trash. Once the Trash is emptied, the page is deleted
  • View – Displays the Post. If the Post hasn’t been published yet, this will say Preview
  • Links from other plugins - Additional plugins may add links to this section.

Next to each Post title is a checkbox. This allows you to perform an action on multiple items at once. You simply check the Posts that you would like to affect and then from the "Bulk actions" dropdown select either the Edit option or the Move to Trash option and then click the Apply button. The Edit option will allow you to edit the Categories, Tags, Author, whether to allow Comments and Pings or not, the Status and whether or not the Posts are ‘Sticky’ (always at the top and newest). The Move to Trash option will move the selected items to the Trash.

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2.2 Pages

After clicking on the Pages menu option you'll be shown a list of Pages that your site contains. Among the information displayed is the Page title, the Author, No. of Comments and either the Date Published or the Date the Page was Last Modified.

At the top of the page you can view how many Pages in total you have in your site, how many have been published by yourself or how many are Published or in Draft.

When hovering your cursor over each row, a few links will appear beneath the Page title.

  • Edit – Will allow you to edit your Page. This is the same as clicking on the Page title
  • Quick Edit – Allows you to edit basic Page information such as Title, Slug, Date plus a few other options
  • Trash – Will send the Page to the Trash. Once the Trash is emptied, the page is deleted
  • View – Displays the Page. If the Page hasn’t been published yet, this will say Preview
  • Links from other plugins - Additional plugins may add links to this section.

Next to each Page title is a checkbox. This allows you to perform an action on multiple items at once. You simply check the Pages that you would like to affect and then from the Bulk Actions dropdown select either the Edit option or the Move to Trash option and then click the Apply button. The Edit option will allow you to edit the Author, Parent, Template, whether to allow Comments or not and the Status of each of the checked items. The Move to Trash option will move the selected items to the Trash.

You can also filter the pages that are displayed using the dropdown list and the Filter button.

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Adding Content

Apart from how Pages and Posts display on your site, the main difference is that Posts allow you to associate Categories and Tags whereas Pages don’t. Normally, Tags are ad-hoc keywords that identify important information in your Post (names, subjects, etc.) that may or may not recur in other Posts, while Categories are pre-determined sections. If you think of your site like a book, the Categories are like the Table of Contents and the Tags are like the terms in the index.

In WordPress 5.0, a brand-new editing interface was introduced. The new editor is called the Block Editor, although you may also know it by its development codename, Gutenberg. The editing interface has been rebuilt to make it easier to create media rich Pages and Posts and to provide you with more flexibility.

Starting from WordPress 5.0, the Block Editor will be the default editor whenever you're creating a new Post. However, if you wish to continue to use the old (TinyMCE) Classic Editor, you can do so by installing the Classic Editor plugin. The Classic Editor plugin will allow you to disable the new Block Editor and instead, will provide you with the same editing interface that you've been using prior to WP 5.0.

The Classic Editor can be downloaded from the Plugin Directory on the WordPress.org website, or you can install it directly onto your site using the Plugins > Add New menu option and then typing in ‘Classic Editor’ (without the quotes) in the Search Plugins field.

3.1 Classic Editor

The Classic Editor, also known as the Visual Editor or TinyMCE Editor, is the default editing experience that came with WordPress prior to version 5.0. Although it's simple in its nature, it has powerful word processing capabilities.

Much like a regular word processor, it has toolbar buttons that allow you to bold or italicize text, add headings or bullet points or even change the color of your text. You can even use most of the basic keyboard shortcuts used in other text editors.

The Classic Editor it is perfect for when you have text heavy content and just need a simple editing interface.

3.2 Adding a New Post

To add a new Post, hover over the Posts menu option in the left-hand navigation menu and in the fly-out menu, click the Add New link. Alternatively, click the Posts menu option and then click the Add New link underneath, or the Add New button at the top of the page. You will be presented with a page similar to the image below.

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3.3 Switching to the Text Editor

At the top of the editor there are two tabs, Visual and Text. These switch the editor view between the Visual Editor and the Text editor. While the Visual editor applies some formatting options by default (like the Microsoft Word processor), the Text view will eliminate those formatting options and enable you to view the HTML code that makes up your content.

The Text editor is much like the Visual Editor, only not as intuitive. The numerous formatting buttons provide you with basic HTML formatting capabilities when editing your Post content.

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The buttons work in two ways:

Clicking a button without highlighting any text first, will simply insert the opening HTML tag relevant for that button. As an example, clicking the Bold button will insert the <strong> HTML tag into your text.

Clicking the Bold button again will close the tag by inserting the closing </strong> tag.

If you highlight some text prior to clicking a button, both the opening and closing tags will be inserted around that highlighted text. For example, highlighting the text, ‘bold text’, prior to clicking the Bold button will insert ‘<strong>bold text</strong>’.

3.4 Adding Media - Inserting an Image

Using the WordPress media manager, it’s extremely simple to insert, align and link your individual images and image galleries.

To insert an image into your Post, click the Add Media button (blue button above the Editor toolbar) and then simply drag your image(s) from wherever they are on your computer, into the browser window. Your file(s) will be automatically uploaded.

Alternatively, click the Select Files button and then select the file(s) that you’d like to upload, using the dialog window that is displayed.

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3.5 Adding Media - Featured Image

A Featured Image, often called a Post Thumbnail, is usually some sort of image that is representative for that particular Post. How these images are displayed is dependent entirely on the Theme that is currently in use.

Setting your featured image is very similar to adding an image into your Post. After clicking the Set featured image link (in the bottom part of the right panel) a pop-up window will display, similar to the one described in previous section. You can upload a new image to use as your Featured Image or you can simply choose from one of your previously uploaded images.

Inserting an HTML link in your Post is extremely easy. While in Visual editor simply click and drag the cursor and highlight the text that you want to turn into a link and then click the Insert/edit link button (chain icon). A small inline link toolbar will display where you can enter your link URL. If you enter a URL without including ‘http://’ in front of it, WordPress will automatically correct it for you. After you’ve entered your link URL, hit your Enter key or click the Apply button (blue arrow button) to save your changes.

You can also insert a link to one of your existing Posts or Pages by simply typing the Post or Page name and then selecting it from the list that displays. As you type the Post/Page name the list will re-populate based on matching results.

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3.7 Saving and Publishing Content

Once you’ve added all your content to your Post you have the option of Saving the Post as a Draft or Publishing the post.

Clicking the Save Draft button will simply save your Post. This is handy if you would like to come back at a later time to add more content or if you’re simply not ready to publish yet.

Clicking the Publish button will save your Post and publish it on your website immediately.

Clicking the Preview button will show you a preview of the current Post in a new browser tab, without publishing.

To change the time of publishing click the Edit link just to the right of Publish immediately within the Publish panel. You can then select the date and time that you’d like to schedule your Post to be published. You must also click the Schedule button when you have updated the date and time fields to publish at the desired date and time.

 

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